Introduction to Data Science for Building Performance Simulation and Architectural Design, Jung Min Han

FULL – Personal Branding for Creative Professionals & Design Entrepreneurs, Diego Olguín

Apocalypse Now, Sophie Weston Chien

Design Your Future, Adam Royalty

Intermediate use of Ladybug, Honeybee, and Butterfly for green building design, Sunghwan Lim

FULL – How to Paint Your Dragon, T.K. Justin Ng

FULL – Academic Reading and Notetaking Strategies, Alison Pasinella and Nicole Santiago

Why are they wearing? A studio course in costume design for the performing arts, Stacey Berman

Dynamic Mutations GSD V6.0, Nicolas Turchi, Yuan Mu, and Niccolò Dambrosio

Chamber Music, Leon Fong and Charlotte Day

Unitized Curtain Wall Systems, Royce Perez

FULL – Exquisite Corpse 2.0 – Machine Learning Applications in Architectural Design, Dongyun Kim and George Guida

CANCELED – Body Comfort: Inflatable Propositions for the Home, Nicolas Carmona Guzman

CANCELED – Indexing Urban Complexities in Latin America: Collective Definitions to Expand Territorial Meaning, Laura Janka

CANCELED – Goods & Services: Prototyping, from objects to experiences, Matt Khinda and Bobby Wang

All Rights Reversed: Assemblage, Entourage, Collage, Rana Irmak Aksoy

CANCELED- Winter Archive Party, Kevin Liu and Ines Zalduendo

FULL – Polyline to Print #2: an in-person introduction to printmaking for designers, Kevin Liu

Mermaids: An Amphibian Story, CoCo Tin

Tell Me a “Story”: Conversations on Mythmaking, Ipek Karaoglu Koksalan, Nicole Piepenbrink, Nawaf Bin Ayyaf Al-Mogren, James Ruan, and Luchuan Deng

Architecture Exhibition Workshop: “Now What?! Advocacy, Activism, and Alliances in American Architecture”, Ilana Curtis

The World of Islamic Architecture, from the Beginnings to the Present Day, Nour-Lyna Boulgamh

CANCELED –Welding & Metal Working Basics, Moises Quintero Morales

How to design, edit and write for an architecture magazine, Will Hunter

How to set up a new school of architecture, Will Hunter

Electronic Music and Design, Christina Shivers

Cozy Publications Workshop, Elsa Hoover Maki

CANCELED – Sensible Models, Elsa Hoover Maki

Exhibiting for Social Change, Eva Lavranou

CANCELED – Hacking for Embodied Carbon: Investigations into digital solutions, Jessica Chenand Kritika Kharbanda

CANCELED – Site In-Sight: Sketching City Life, Naksha Satish and Gauri Nagpal

Live Space, Min Keun Park

Elevating Earth: New Recipes for Rammed Earth Architecture, Taylor Smith and Dylan Gibbs

1 Poem and 3 Images, Lafina Eptaminitaki

Border Urbanism and Geospatial Intelligence: Spatial and conflict mitigation using augment and virtual reality technologies, Alia Bader, Bruce Boucek, and Mathew Cook

Courses are added and updated on a daily basis.


Introduction to Data Science for Building Performance Simulation and Architectural Design

Instructors: Jung Min Han, DDes ‘22
Zoom Link:  TBA
Max Enrollment: 35

The modeling of energy-efficient buildings and sustainable urban development is an increasing concern in both the building design and sustainability consulting industries. Early adoption of building performance simulation software for decision-making during the design phase is essential to achieving sustainable design goals. Guiding designers to pursue sustainability in their built environments will bring favorable outcomes and low-cost adaptations. Machine learning (ML) and data science are promising approaches to shaping the design process and offer instantaneous performance feedback. The active use of data science techniques increases the efficiency and accuracy of building simulation workflow and the optimization of building geometry.

This class will leverage data science and performance simulation as the primary drivers in determining design decisions. In the last decade, the fundamentals of building performance simulation tools for energy, daylighting, airflow, and renewable energies have been translated into performance simulation tools and metrics with relevant measures. There are great advantages for students learning to use such tools, including the ability to calculate metrics and apply related methodologies in their building designs. However, such utilization requires a high level of understanding of the computations necessary for the geometric modeling process, as well as relevant programming skills. These programming skills and analysis techniques will be explained in this class with practical hands-on workshops to impart environmental information and predict building performance in response to design changes. This course will also introduce data management skills such as Python scripting, ML, and data visualization for advanced research.

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 4, Tues Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 10 – 11:30 am 10 – 11:30 am 10 – 11:30 am 10 – 11:30 am 10 – 11:30 am

Prerequisites: Students are encouraged to consider the course’s time limitations and prepare in advance. This will ensure access to the full benefits of this course. Reviewing a Python tutorial and obtaining a general understanding of its basic operations is highly recommended for those unfamiliar with Python. However, students without prior experience in Python or other programming languages will still be able to follow along and participate in the introductory workshops.

Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Personal Branding for Creative Professionals & Design Entrepreneurs

Instructors: Diego Olguín, MDes ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 12

Students will learn about the basic concepts in branding design and building a brand for their own practice as independent designers or entrepreneurs.

During the first week, students will walk through the basic concepts, skills, and language they need to know to develop their brand. In the second week, they will work on their own brand, utilizing the creative process presented over the first week. Students will come out of this course with a personal brand + a guide on how to keep expanding it.

Deliverables of the course: creative concept statement, graphic pathways, a logotype (plus one or two variations), color palette selection, typography selection.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 9-11 a.m. 9-10 a.m. 9-10 a.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan.12, Wed Jan. 13, Thurs
Time: 9-11 a.m. 9-11 a.m. 9-12 a.m.

Prerequisites: Required knowledge of basic Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop. Rhino (optional).

Cost/Materials: Sketchbook and sketching tools (analog or digital)

Enrollment Link – FULL –  to be added to a waitlist, please contact the instructor, Diego Olguín.


Apocalypse Now

Instructors: Sophie Weston Chien, MLA I AP ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 20

Shallow and short tutorials on things you should know for the impending apocalypse. The course includes a close reading of Octavia Butler’s Parable of the Sower, where we will consider the role of community building in traumatic times. Workshops on self-sufficient skills will also be presented daily (skills include storytelling, weaving, conflict resolution, sewing, wilderness first-aid, foraging, understanding natural systems, edible plant identification). All participants will have the opportunity to develop and teach their own skills during the class. At the end of the course, students will prepare a field guide with tutorials and ideas for the future.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan.12, Wed Jan. 13, Thurs
Time: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: $20/Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler

Enrollment Link


Design Your Future

Instructors: Adam Royalty, DDes ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 35

The future can feel uncertain. It is not even clear how the next few months will unfold. How does this uncertainty affect your time at Harvard? How does it impact your plans post-Harvard? Design Your Future is a two-session course where participants learn to apply Human-centered Design to navigate tough decisions in their careers and life. These tools are also useful for leading teams through uncertainty in academic and professional settings.​

During the first session, students will critically examine their personal history before mapping future courses of action.

During the second session, students will confront internal and external barriers that prevent people from moving forward.

Date: Jan. 6, Thurs Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 1-4 p.m. 1-4 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Intermediate use of Ladybug, Honeybee, and Butterfly for green building design

Instructor: Sunghwan Lim, Ph.D. ‘26
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 50

In this course, we will learn how to utilize Grasshopper plugins Ladybug, Honeybee, and Butterfly for green building design. The instructor will guide from the installation of the software, core techniques, and to advanced level of simulations, those will support your design targeting for energy-efficient and low-carbon building.

About the software:

Unlike conventional simulation methods those you must make a separate geometry for each building simulation, the plugins read your Rhino models directly and perform simulations. Also, design enhancements you make in your Rhino model are simultaneously recognized in the plugins and assess the improvements.

Ladybug allows to analyze weather data and visualize the results from simulations including solar radiation analysis for PV panel design, view analysis for window design. Honeybee performs daylight simulation and energy simulation supported by validated simulation engines, including Radiance and EnergyPlus. Butterfly performs CFD simulation which supports design decisions in a naturally ventilated building. You can find more about the plugins at this link (https://www.food4rhino.com/en/app/ladybug-tools).

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 11, Tues Jan.12, Wed Jan. 13, Thurs Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 10 – 11:30 a.m. 10 – 11:30 a.m. 10 – 11:30 a.m. 10 – 11:30 a.m. 10 – 11:30 a.m.

Prerequisites: Device with Rhino 7 installed. Basic understanding in Rhino and Grasshopper.
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


­­­­­­­How to Paint Your Dragon

Instructors: T.K. Justin Ng, M. Arch I ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 16

Are you tired of straining your eyes and mind on Illustrator and Photoshop? Rediscover your passion for analogue representation by drawing and watercolor painting this winter break.

Over six workshops, this course will explore a myriad of techniques necessary to unleash your creativity on paper. Not only will we cover how to mix colors and control washes, but the course will also examine the effects of different papers, paints and brushes on your paintings. We will play with watercolor’s unpredictable nature to create a sense of depth and texture. The first week will cover foundational techniques that leave you at ease with the medium. For the second week, students are encouraged to tackle subject matters based on their interests: landscapes, buildings, dragons…

The class will meet on Monday, Tuesday and Friday afternoons. At the final class, students will present 2-3 of their watercolor paintings. No prior experience in watercolor is necessary.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan.12, Wed Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: $20, excluding paint

Enrollment Link – FULL –  to be added to a waitlist, please contact the instructor, T.K. Justin Ng.


Academic Reading and Notetaking Strategies

Instructors: Alison Pasinella, Frances Loeb Library Assistant and Nicole Santiago, Frances Loeb Librarian
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 16

As a student at the GSD, you will need to perform independent research and complete lengthy reading assignments for your classes. In this course, you’ll learn how to do so efficiently to maximize retention. You will learn to apply strategies for skimming, scanning, and underlining to situations where time is limited and readings are extensive. Coursework will also include peer work and hands-on practice creating paraphrases, summaries, and outlines of challenging texts using techniques you can apply to future assignments and research. The course will be led by professional staff from GSD Writing Services. Class will meet for an hour on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 1:30-2:30pm.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 4, Tues Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 11, Tues Jan. 13, Thurs
Time: 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. 1:30 – 2:30 p.m.

Prerequisites:  N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link – Full 


Why are they wearing? A studio course in costume design for the performing arts

Instructor: Stacey Berman, MDes ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 12

Over the course of 3 sessions, we will explore the role of costume in a constructed environment. Organized as a studio, we will each respond to selected source materials (i.e. texts/scripts/poems/choreography, score) and then discuss our work via group critique. Our process will take us from research through rendering, with the possibility of a guided build/garment creation contingent on independent interest. We will cover both practical skills such as “breaking down” a script, methods of research and forms of presentation as well as conceptual pathways such as materiality, color, silhouette and narrative.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 1 – 4 p.m. 1 – 4 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 11, Tues
Time: 1 – 4 p.m.

Prerequisites: Texts/scripts, provided by the instructor, to read in advance of the first meeting
Cost/Materials: Can be completed entirely with internet/libraries and the Adobe Suite. Optional use of other/non-digital artistic media at students’ own expense.

Enrollment Link


Dynamic Mutations GSD V6.0

Instructors: Nicolas Turchi, M. Arch II ’18; Yuan Mu, MDes ’18; and Niccolò Dambrosio, M. Arch II ’17
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: N/A

This two-day workshop will introduce a set of studies through a dynamic workflow between Autodesk Maya and McNeel Rhino+Grasshopper. It intends to approach software on displaying the unique connections between its key features. It will explore the foundation of polygon modeling and utilize UV mapping to create relations between geometry and its topology. Moving forward to expand the workflow on time-based effects, it will take a step back and generate curves or topographical lines through shared features with the geometry. Using those curves as guidelines, students will get familiar with the essential interface, gain experience in the combination of manual sculpting and physical simulation, create computational modeling and effects with certain degrees of freedom. Along with learning procedural design, students will be encouraged to re-evaluate the connection between different techniques and break the boundaries of the conventional thinking around said tools.

What You Will Learn

  • Introduction to Maya and Grasshopper user interfaces
  • Mesh subdivision polygonal modeling
  • Duplication and animated mirror cut
  • UV mapping and edit
  • 2d-3d curve extraction and mapping
  • Parametric modeling/simulation with linked curve drivers
  • Sculpting, deformation, and mesh manipulation
  • Rendering with Arnold in Maya

Requirements

  • Autodesk Maya 2018 or above
  • McNeel Rhinoceros 7 + Grasshopper
  • Grasshopper Plugins: Pufferfish, Weaverbird, Mesh+, Kangaroo
Date: Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Chamber Music

Instructors: Leon Fong, M. Arch I ’24 and Charlotte Day, M. Arch I ’24
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 10

Chamber music takes its name from the room in which it is produced. In some ways, this chamber is the real instrument, host to a multitude of smaller chambers (violins, cellos, gravicembalos […]), magnifying their vibrations into a description of itself. 

In this virtual one-week workshop, each participant will create a musical instrument/sound-chamber from materials found in nature. The chambers will be without scale, and may be read as instruments or architecture. We will ask participants to invent gestures, both of crafting the chambers and of performing them, so that they produce music apt to the environments of their making. Throughout the exercise, we will gather attitudes to place, performance, and the acoustic properties of material. The culmination of the workshop will be a short film that bears witness to the sounds and images sampled in this collective effort.

Things we will think about:

  • The history of instruments, ornament, things made precious
  • Resonant space, sounds of spaces, sounds of places
  • Scalelessness, ambivalent readings, boxes in boxes in boxes
  • Performance, tuning things, lifting things, preparation

Things we will make:

  • A chamber
  • A sound recording
  • A video (whose relation to chamber and sound recording may be oblique/associative)
Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 12, Wed Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m. 1 – 3 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link 


Unitized Curtain Wall Systems

Instructors: Royce Perez, M. Arch I ‘17
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 12

As designers we are confronted with the facade on a regular basis. As we progress throughout our career the term “facade” takes on many technical meanings along with specific curtainwall types. This course aims at providing a general understanding of the unitized system, a subset of curtain wall assemblies. Unitized curtain walls are typical in the architecture industry.

As an architect and facade consultant with a design and technical background, the course is a balanced approach of not being overly technical but not devoid of real-world considerations. We must go beyond designing surfaces to the understanding of how building envelopes are designed, fabricated, and installed on site. This understanding is meant for you to enter practice and engage with informed design and material decisions. Beyond the understanding of the functional aspects of unitized curtain walls, we will focus on the materials used within this system; this includes glass, aluminum, stone, terracotta, glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC), and their many possible attachments.

The application of understanding will be through the production of “roadmap” drawings, which include plan, section, and elevation with key details called out; a typical method in practice. The basis for design may either be the student’s design produced in the course or a case study from a list provided. Additionally, axonometrics of facade fragments are encouraged to provide further understanding the design intent. Typical plan and section details will be developed with review from the instructor. Examples will be provided along with a Rhino template with curtain wall geometry.

The first two classes are introductions into technical concepts and materials used in unitized curtain walls. The third and fourth classes will be based on specific questions students may have about their designs in progress and additional unitized curtain wall topics. The last two classes will be students presenting their facade designs to the class.

Full course description can be found here.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 13, Thurs Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Prerequisites: Experience with Rhino and Illustrator is beneficial. Vray is a plus but not required.
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Exquisite Corpse 2.0 – Machine Learning Applications in Architectural Design

Instructor: Dongyun Kim, MDes ’22 and George Guida, M. Arch II ’22
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 15

The exquisite corpse was a game routinely used by Surrealists to “disrupt the waking mind’s penchant for order”. It hinged on free play and generated unexpected results “unimaginable by one brain alone”. We seek to continue this game today through the lens of machine learning algorithms paired with our collective agency as designers.

This incremental 4-day workshop will introduce the applications of machine learning to architectural design. The game will begin with an understanding of the benefits and limitations of this technology including bias, intelligence, and creativity. This will then be followed by a series of hands-on workshops covering 2D Style Transfer to 3D object manipulation, in which each student will develop an individual or group design project.

This course will be divided into three parts: Dataset collection, GAN Training, and 3D object manipulations. Dataset collection will equip students with an understanding of the emerging agency of designers and the implicit bias ingrained within these. The training of state-of-the-art machine learning models and their manipulation into new 3D forms will be used to challenge an emerging homogeneity in architectural design. These will additionally shed light on the emerging role of the designer and how images can be synthesized into 3D ‘exquisite corpses’.

The tangible skills offered in this workshop will cover the scraping of online datasets, using simple Python with libraries such as BeautifulSoup, the training of GAN (Generative Adversarial Network) models such as Style Transfer and StyleGAN, and their manipulation through grasshopper workflows. Students will be asked to use these models to develop individual or group exquisite corpse projects, presented on the final day, and may extend across architectural, landscape, or urban design interests.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 9 a.m. – 1p.m. 9 a.m. – 1p.m. 19 a.m. – 1p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon
Time: 9 a.m. – 1p.m.
  • Office hours: Jan 4 and 6 from 9-10 a.m.

Prerequisites: Experience with Python, Rhinoceros, and Grasshopper is a plus, but not necessary.
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link – FULL –  to be added to a waitlist, please contact the instructors, Dongyun Kim and George Guida


Body Comfort: Inflatable Propositions for the Home

Instructor: Nicolas Carmona Guzman, M. Arch II ‘22
Zoom Link and In-Person Location: Zoom Location TBA/ Gund Hall, FabLab Project Room
Max Enrollment: 10

This hybrid workshop course will examine domestic leisure through the design and fabrication of inflatable prototypes for human use. These prototypes will work at the scale of the individual and will borrow freely from both garment and furniture design as we examine specific activities, programs, or ideas of comfort in the home.

The first half of the course will be conducted remotely, and it will consist of an introductory lecture and software tutorials. Each participant will be asked to select a concept of leisure to develop during the workshop and to take a stand on its optimal physical manifestation. These propositions will be discussed as a class. The second half of the course will take place in person at Gund, as we translate each design into a working prototype through material experimentation. Our medium will consist of plastic sheets cut with the help of the Zund cutter and heat-welded together using an iron.

Week 1: Online Meetings via Zoom

Date: Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 12 – 2p.m. 12 – 2p.m. 12 – 2p.m.

Week 2: Gund Hall, FabLab Project Room

Date: Jan. 12, Wed Jan. 13, Thurs Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 12 – 2p.m. 12 – 2p.m. 12 – 2p.m.


Prerequisites:
Fabrication Lab safety trainings/Some 3D modeling experience, and access to a regular or craft iron
Cost/Materials: $40 for plastic rolls and inflatable valves to be purchased in bulk

CANCELED


Indexing Urban Complexities in Latin America: Collective Definitions to Expand Territorial Meaning

Instructor: Laura Janka, MAUD ‘11
Zoom Link and In-Person Location: TBA
Max Enrollment: 20

Participants in this course will learn about the process of creating a collaborative and systematic platform as a tool to understand urban complexity – from concept design, framework definition, content development and platform building. Based on the methodology used by the ABCDMXYZ project, this course will use a crowdsourcing approach seeking to expand meaning and content of territorial complexity through concepts and definitions that both question the status quo of Latin American contexts while embracing possible transformations.

This course will include a combination of short presentations, discussion sessions and workshops using selected literature, project references and media sources to identify words, geographical conditions, and their intersectionality to organize and define concepts. Participants activities will include session preparation such as  literature review, reference material review, and individual writing; as well as activities during the online session including active brainstorming, database building, and collective tool design.

The course deliverable will be a collective tool in the form of an index focused on a specific geography.

For an overview of meeting topics, please view the course outline.

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 11, Tues Jan. 12, Wed Jan. 13, Thurs Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 4- 7p.m. 4- 6p.m. 4- 6p.m. 4- 6p.m. 4- 6p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

CANCELED


Goods & Services: Prototyping, from objects to experiences

Instructor: Matt Khinda, MUP ‘23 and Bobby Wang, MUP ‘21
In-Person Location: Gund Hall (TBD)
Max Enrollment: 15

Prototypes are questions made tangible—What is a comfortable height for this chair? Do people prefer to use this app on their phone or laptop? How easy is it for someone to find their gate in this airport? As architects, designers, and planners are broadening their creative practices, they should be equipped with the tools to ask an equally broad set of questions.
This three part workshop will look at what it means to prototype at different scales, in various materials, and with a range of tools. The first day will focus on objects and the prototypes that help make them ergonomic, aesthetic, functional, and mass-producible. Participants will then have the opportunity to make a physical prototype of their own using cardboard, foam core, or other low-cost materials. The second day will consider interfaces and discuss ways of digitally prototyping an app, website, or software program without having to write any code. Participants will get the chance to create their own interactive prototype for an app or website of their choosing. Finally, the third day will explore what it means to prototype an experience. This conversation will examine how the previously discussed topics of objects and interfaces come together to comprise an end-to-end service. Participants will put this in practice by mapping and acting out their proposed service or experience.
All participants will receive a small booklet of the prototyping methods covered in the workshop for future use and reference.

Date: Jan. 11, Tues Jan. 13, Thurs Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 1- 4p.m. 1- 4p.m. 1- 4p.m.

Prerequisites: Familiarity with 3D modeling (Rhino, SketchUp, Solidworks) and interaction design tools (Figma, Adobe XD, Invision) will be helpful, but is not necessary. Additionally, introductory tutorials on Rhino and Figma will be offered as part of this workshop.
Cost/Materials: $20

CANCELED


All Rights Reversed: Assemblage, Entourage, Collage

Instructor: Rana Irmak Aksoy, M. Arch I ‘22
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 10

Disclaimer (/ Prompt): YOU MAY COPY, REPRODUCE, DISTRIBUTE, PUBLISH, DISPLAY, PERFORM, MODIFY, CREATE DERIVATIVE WORKS, OR IN ANY WAY EXPLOIT ANY PART OF THE ARCHITECTURAL CANON.

Images are intellectual properties of the collective subconscious. Architectural images render visible the mainstream canon’s bias towards certain figures – glorifying some while misrepresenting and excluding others. The course will be an exercise in claiming space in architecture’s representational realm through the medium of collage by assembling, modifying, and deriving.

Over the course of three workshops, we will experiment with representational methods borrowed from contemporary art practices with a particular focus on bodies, collective and personal memories, and cultural narratives associated with architectural space. These will be in the form of collages that get into dialogue with a particular representational problem and destabilize the medium of representation through staged or appropriated images. We will experiment with ways of challenging or undoing the predominant gaze in images to reclaim othered, stereotyped, or marginalized bodies and spaces.

Participants will be encouraged to experiment with analog and digital tools to develop their own representational method. Recommended readings and references will be shared along with the syllabus prior to the first session.

Session I – Assemblage: Participants will be expected to bring and present a collection of images (ranging from personal to collective) to create a mass of ‘assembled histories’ that resonate with them and a reflect a particular representational problem.
[Ex: Deana Lawson’s ‘Assemblages’, where she juxtaposes images from ethnographic studies, celebrity tabloids, political figures, and family photos]

Session II – Entourage: Participants will choose 1-4 images from their assemblages to intervene upon by inserting new figures or transforming existing figures in uncanny, unexpected, or subversive ways.

[Ex: Cindy Sherman’s ‘Untitled Film Stills’, where she parodies female stereotypes by photographing herself in settings that imitate paintings or movie scenes]

Session III – Collage: Participants will reflect the figural transformations in the previously modified images onto the architectural space. The transformations of the represented space will imply new notions of subject hood and collectivity, and the architectural images will speculate on the translation of spaces into contemporary life.

[Ex: Wangechi Mutu’s ‘I Am Speaking, Are You Listening?’ installation, where she modifies a European art gallery with figures and spatial elements that reflect Afrofuturism and feminism]

Date: Jan. 4, Tues Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 10a.m.- 12p.m. 10a.m.- 12p.m. 10a.m.- 12p.m.

Prerequisites: Suggested readings and image collecting to be completed prior to the first session; Knowledge of Adobe Photoshop is recommended.
Cost/Materials: Digital/Analog media

Enrollment Link


Winter Archive Party

Instructor: Kevin Liu, MDes ‘21 and Ines Zalduendo, Special Collections Archivist
In-Person Location: Gund Hall, Special Collections (L12)
Max Enrollment: 12

This J-Term workshop is intended to give GSD students an opportunity during the winter break to become acquainted with Special Collections by working directly with materials from the Rare Book Collection and Archival Collections at the Frances Loeb Library.

The workshop is divided into three workshops: the first will follow on from a previous “archive party” format where Ines Zalduendo and Kevin Liu will present a curated selection of materials to get a sense of the type of materials included in each of the two collections.

The second workshop will focus on some theoretical underpinnings of library science and archival practice that, when known, can facilitate searches with intent that lead to pertinent discovery through Hollis and Hollis for Archival Discovery. There will be time to discuss specific interests of participants, with an opportunity to discover, explore, and request items for their own research or out of curiosity.

During the third and final workshop, participants will receive their requested materials for study in the reading room and will be encouraged to document the materials through writing, photography, video, or scanning. Participants will then present the materials to the group and discuss their experience and/or findings in relation to their initial expectations of the materials.

This workshop assumes some level of familiarity with Special Collections and is perfect for those with archival research projects or those who are undertaking thesis projects.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 4, Tues Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 3 – 5p.m. 3 – 5p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 11, Tues
Time: 3 – 5p.m.

 Prerequisites: Interested participants are expected to have visited Special Collections (room L12 in the basement) at least once during their time at GSD. For those who are yet to visit but are still interested, please email Ines Zalduendo or Kevin Liu directly with an introduction.
Cost/Materials: N/A

CANCELED


Polyline to Print #2: an in-person introduction to printmaking for designers

Instructor: Kevin Liu, MDes ‘21
Zoom Location:  TBA
Max Enrollment: 6

This is a 3-day beginner-level printmaking course introduction to the basics of intaglio copper plate etching, in relation to architectural representation and practice. Moving on from the purely virtual format of January 2021, this workshop will cover most of the steps of etching an architectural drawing of a student’s choosing (as a vector-line PDF) on to a copper plate, to then be printed onto heavyweight printmaking papers.

There are three mandatory sessions for this workshop, with some additional time allotted in the home studio for additional work, preparation, or finishing of the etching plates or prints.

Workshop 1: Some examples of etchings, including a very brief introduction to other printmaking processes. A discussion of the project to follow, including some examples.

Workshop 2: Plate preparation. By this session, participants will need to have prepared a PDF image (4” x 6”) ready for plotting in the AxiDraw to be etched on to the plate.

Workshop 3: Plate printing. With the plates etched, the plates will be inked and run through the etching press.

Each participant at the end will receive their copper etching plate, as well as a small edition (3) of their prints, along with any other proofs made along the way. Each participant will be asked to cover the cost of their plate. Paper and inks will be included at no cost.

Week 1: Online Meetings Via Zoom

Date: Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 2 – 4 p.m. 2 – 4 p.m.

Week 2: Gund Hall, Room TBD (In-person Canceled)

Date: Jan. 10, Mon
Time: 2 – 4 p.m.

Prerequisites: This course is designed for people with no printmaking experience and no knowledge of printmaking is preferred.  However, knowledge of Illustrator or a CAD package that can print to PDF with vector linework is absolutely required, you will need to produce a Vector linework artwork (preferable as PDF) in order to be able to prepare a plate for printing.
Cost/Materials: $40 to cover the cost of 1 etching plate as well as postage costs. All paper and inks included.

Enrollment Link – FULL –  to be added to a waitlist, please contact the instructor, Kevin Liu.

 


Mermaids: An Amphibian Story

Instructor: CoCo Tin, MDes ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 20

Be it a mother’s womb or a test-tube, mankind is born in fluids, yet have seemingly embarked on a one way, land bound trip with no return. Our bodies are more than 80% water; the Earth’s surface is 71% water and growing. Wetness is the foundation of life but also a blind spot clouded by subliminal fear. Lethal infections such as tuberculosis, is a buildup of excess fluid in the lungs. The imminent climate crisis not only brings threats of flooding, but also the potential for territorial scale destruction to our technocratic societies.

Divided into three parts, this J-Term workshop draws on the figure of the mermaid to trouble the narrative of nature-culture binary, questions boundaries of the body, and engages in myths, legends, and fairy tale origins stories as alternative ways of knowledge building.

Part 1: An Amphibian Story, cites our narrative between land and sea; the figure of the mermaid will form a thematic foundation for critique.

Part 2: The Little Mermaid (1989) in Popular Imagination, applies the framework developed in Part 1 for an eco-feminist reading of Disney’s 1989 film.

Part 3: Many Mermaids, is a presentation-discussion of a single mermaid manifestation, from a culture of the student’s choosing, to be shared with the class.

Full workshop description can be found here.

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 10, Mon
Time: 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. 9- 11a.m.

Prerequisites: Please watch Disney’s 1989 ‘The Little Mermaid’
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Tell Me a “Story”: Conversations on Mythmaking

Instructors: Ipek Karaoglu Koksalan, Nicole Piepenbrink, Nawaf Bin Ayyaf Al-Mogren, James Ruan, and Luchuan Deng (MDes ’22)
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: N/A

This course examines the embedded forces of power in the built environment on a global scale. In many cases, we see that the ‘myth’ of a place, created and sustained by these forces, shapes the formation, design, and perception of our surroundings.

Through discussions and short Zoom lectures given by invited scholars from China, Turkey, the U.S., and Saudi Arabia, we aim to uncover myths related to heritage narratives, identity construction, and underlying power structures in a cross-cultural manner by comparing and contrasting findings from our respective contexts. This course also serves as a starting point for students to reflect upon and examine their daily observations, providing them with a different lens through which they can analyze mythmaking in their familiar context.

Each class will consist of two 40-minute lectures and a 30-40 minute discussion session.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 4, Tues Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 10 a.m. – 12p.m. 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 11, Tues Jan. 13, Thurs
Time: 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Architecture Exhibition Workshop: “Now What?! Advocacy, Activism, and Alliances in American Architecture”

Instructors: Ilana Curtis, MDes ’23
Zoom Link: TBD
Max Enrollment: N/A

Now What?! is a traveling exhibition that links the US design community to larger social and political movements of the mid-twentieth century to present day. After a two-year hiatus, Now What?! is slated to open at the Boston Society of Architects (BSA) space in spring 2022 and our team is now faced with the important task of documenting the events of 2020-21 within the scope of the Boston exhibition. Now What?! needs the help of a new generation of student researchers and designers to bring the exhibition up to speed!

This course provides participants with the framework and network to research and contribute new exhibition materials (images, texts, videos, etc.) that offer an in-depth look at design activism in Boston. Through conversations with BSA staff, local practitioners, exhibition designers, and Now What?! curators, workshop participants will gain practical experience working on an architecture exhibition.

All participants will be acknowledged as research assistants in the exhibition credits and are invited to participate in the exhibition installation and programming this spring. Students interested in exhibition-making, design activism, content development, and research methodology will find these workshops especially valuable.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 4, Tues Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.


Week 2

Date: Jan. 11, Tues Jan. 13, Thurs
Time: 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


The World of Islamic Architecture, from the Beginnings to the Present Day

Instructors: Nour-Lyna Boulgamh, MDes ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 10

We will start off by providing an overview of Islamic architecture from Spain to Indonesia from the 7th century to the present. Major examples of religious and secular architecture, including mosques, madrasas, palaces, and caravanserais. Then, we will cover the development of architecture and decorative styles in Egypt and Syria from the Arab to the Ottoman conquests and the Mamluk period. Lastly, we will look into religious and secular architecture and decoration of North Africa and discuss of formative impulses from Byzantium and Umayyad Syria. In the last class, Students will be asked to give a 10 minute presentation about a specific building from the era studied, identifying at least 10 Islamic architectural features covered.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.


Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. 11 a.m. – 11 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Welding & Metal Working Basics

Instructor: Moises Quintero Morales, M. Arch II ‘23
Location: GSD Fabrication Lab
Max Enrollment: 6

Through this course, students will be introduced to some of the tools that the metal shop in our fabrication lab have to offer. They will learn how to work with these tools to produce two small projects. Some tools include grinders, sheet metal press, bandsaw, bar bender, and welders. The goal is to learn the basics and safety guidelines to allow students to feel comfortable to fabricate and work with metal outside of this course.

Deliverables for the first week is to get acquainted with the tools needed to fold and spot weld a simple sheet metal box. Deliverables for the second week include learning the different kinds of beads needed to weld heavier pieces of metal using the school’s MIG Welding machine. The final project will be a small simple welded wine rack which the students can take home.

WEEK 1: Learn Metal basics

  • Intro to metal shop and tools
  • Learn to cut sheet metal (Use a printed templated)
  • Learn to punch holes with hand tool
  • Learn to cut heavy metal (Cut squares for next week project)
  • Learn to Fold sheet metal with the press
  • Learn to spot weld box to a finished product (Roughly 5”x7”x2”)
  • Introduction to welding beads (On scrap metal, Grind down at the end of the day to teach grinding down)

WEEK 2: Learn to Weld

  • Learn to make more beads
  • Learn to prepare metal (Miter, bevel, remove scaling)
  • Horizontal Weld
  • Vertical Weld
  • Cut & prepare own pieces for final project
  • Weld Wine rack
  • Grind down, finish & paint wine rack

Week 1

Date: Jan. 4, Tues Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs Jan. 7, Fri
Group A: 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Group B: 1 – 2:30 p.m. 1 – 2:30 p.m. 1 – 2:30 p.m. 1 – 2:30 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 11, Tues Jan. 12, Wed Jan. 13, Thurs Jan. 14, Fri
Group A: 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Group B: 1 – 2:30 p.m. 1 – 2:30 p.m. 1 – 2:30 p.m. 1 – 2:30 p.m. 1 – 2:30 p.m.

*Group assignments will be assigned randomly.

Prerequisites: GSD Fabrication Lab Trains – woodshop orientation (and quiz), Fabrication Lab agreement form, and the Hazardous material.
Cost/Materials: N/A

CANCELED


How to design, edit and write for an architecture magazine

Instructors: Will Hunter, Loeb Fellow ‘22
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: N/A

This course aims to teach students the fundamentals of magazine craft and journalistic communication.

The first part will cover the basics of how to craft prose with clarity and flair; the second part on how to design publications that effectively integrate text and images.

The course will be hands-on, and students will be guided to write a short text and produce a magazine design template. The intention is that this workshop could feed directly into your other projects. Feedback will be provided on what you produce.

The course is being taught by Will Hunter, the founder of the London School of Architecture and former executive editor of The Architectural Review.

The course should be of value to any student who is presently producing written work, or who may be interested in pursuing journalism/criticism in the future.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 2 – 3:30 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 13, Thurs
Time: 2 – 3:30 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


How to set up a new school of architecture

Instructors: Will Hunter, Loeb Fellow ‘22
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 35

This course will explore the experience of founding the London School of Architecture. It will provide insight into this specific example of entrepreneurial design thinking and offer inspiration and advice for any student who is considering an entrepreneurial venture in their future.

We will look at the fundamentals of constructing a mission-driven organization, such as crafting a vision and strategy, identifying stakeholders and market position, developing a theory of change, and articulating impact.

Students will have the opportunity to develop the outline for an entrepreneurial idea that they are passionate about, with feedback being provided on what they produce. Students will also be asked to think about what their own ideal school of architecture would be, and how it could be constructed.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 2 – 3:30 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 2 – 3:30 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Electronic Music and Design

Instructor: Christina Shivers, Ph.D. ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 12

This course will investigate the intersection of electronic music with design. Electronic music has a strong history associated with radical spatial, cultural, and design practice. From the underground club spaces created by Black DJs in Chicago and Detroit, to illegal warehouse raves for Queer communities, or even the creation of ad-hoc and DIY electronic instruments – communities across the world have carved out their own spaces through the use of electronic music. Through investigating this rich history, this course will focus on the radical spatial potential of electronic music. The history of genres like techno, house, experimental, ambient, and more will be discussed, and students will learn basic electronic music theory. After this introduction, the workshop will then focus on basic electronics. Using basic electronic components provided by the instructor, students will learn basic electronics and create simple oscillators, clock sources, and learn to use photosensitive sensors and motion detectors. Students will then be tasked with the creation of a simple musical instrument that must respond to environmental stimuli. Deliverables: Final project showing a basic understanding of DIY electronic techniques learned in class. Course Schedule: M-F 9am-12pm; Class sessions will consist of a 1-hour lecture followed by in class work time with the instructor. 

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 11, Tues Jan.12, Wed Jan. 13, Thurs Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: Approximately $25-35 each for electronic components

Enrollment Link


Cozy Publications Workshop

Instructors: Elsa Hoover Maki, M. Arch I ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 10

You want to publish your writing, drawing, or something else. You are stuck; not sure. You want some constructive company for sharing drafts and getting ideas while wrapped up in cozy blankets with a nice cup of tea. There are no costs associated with this J-Term course. Playlist links and reading recommendations will be provided. Elsa is a published author, editor, and illustrator/mapmaker who can offer inexpert critiques, but the goal for this course will be to share insights and experiences together. Bring a draft or collection of ideas for publication to discuss at the first meeting and leave with a short workplan. The following two sessions will review progress and provide editing as needed in a friendly atmosphere.

Date: Jan. 6, Tues Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 13, Thurs
Time: 1 – 1:40 p.m. 1 – 1:40 p.m. 1 – 1:40 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Sensible Models

Instructors: Elsa Hoover Maki, M. Arch I ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 12

Smell and taste are notoriously absent from architectural representation. The first meeting of this course will introduce methods for constructing sensory models, particularly scent-embedded surfaces and translating smell and taste to visual representation. Sensory mapping and modeling precedents will be shown. Readings will touch on aerosol movement, the history of smells in the city, and the role of scent in memory. In the following two meetings, we will experiment with techniques and materials based on each participant’s supplies and interests, possibly including perfumed paper or textile models, edible models, filming vapor, soaking wood. Each person will aim to bring a satisfying sensory model to the last meeting.

Date: Jan. 5, Mon Jan. 12, Wed Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 11 – 11:40 a.m. 11 – 11:40 a.m. 11 – 11:40 a.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: Determined by student; found/free materials preferred.

CANCELED


Exhibiting for Social Change

Instructor: Eva Lavranou, MDes ‘22
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 12

The act of exhibiting entails the desire to present something in public, to inform, to provoke, to communicate, to share an idea. This short course explores how exhibitions can become laboratories for future ideas and create social change. It is about time to recognize that design can be a force for social good and the role of design exhibitions is not anymore to display work to celebrate an individual designer or an architect but to prepare the grounds for building a pedagogical narrative. How can we use exhibitions as platforms to address the complex challenges of today’s society? What is the role of curatorial practice in relation to sociopolitical advocacy and activism? How can museums, cultural institutions and Biennials test new modes of knowledge, enhance a dialogue, and bring the community together? This project-based seminar will examine diverse examples of exhibitions that managed to trigger a sociopolitical challenge, redefine storytelling, change stereotypes or give voice to the voiceless. We will explore how exhibition making can raise awareness, activate public interaction and engagement and lead to the possibility of social change. The lectures will focus on radical exhibition examples, display methods, curatorial decisions and exhibition making. Ultimately, we will explore how through exhibitions we can imagine new ways of envisioning and inhabiting the world.

Deliverables
Each student will generate a proposal for an unconventional exhibition that addresses a societal issue. The proposals should critically engage with the present, develop a clear concept, and articulate the curatorial decisions. During the workshops, the students will choose and analyze case studies from past exhibitions, pick a topic of their interest and start developing an exhibition concept. The final product will be an exhibition concept on A3size Board. It can be a series of drawings, diagrams, an exhibition poster, a collage, a recipe, a video, or an animation. Students should also prepare a curatorial statement (200-300 words) and come up with an exhibition title.

Date: Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 10 a.m. – 12p.m. 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Hacking for Embodied Carbon: Investigations into digital solutions

Instructor: Jessica Chen, MDes ‘22 and Kritika Kharbanda, MDes ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 16

The building industry contributes to 40% of the global GHG emissions. Looking at all the new construction that is projected to take place between now and 2040, embodied carbon contributes to almost 57% while operational carbon has a lower contribution, of 43%. Therefore, the building industry needs to address the embodied carbon critically.

This course offers a critical understanding of the topics around embodied carbon, along with the practices for the analysis across different design stages. Moreover, students are encouraged to bring their own project related to the aspect of embodied carbon. The projects can range across scales, like studying different envelope assemblies for trade-offs between embodied and operational carbon, to integrating structural knowledge into Cardinal LCA, a tool developed by the instructors. Through design-focused and hack-it approach, interweaving digital tools with the subject, the course shall unravel the complexities behind gaining a holistic overview of carbon in buildings, be it operational or embodied. The course includes a combination of theory (1 class), workshop (2 classes),  and ‘hackathon’ (2 classes).

Please visit the course outline for an overview of the workshop structure.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 6, Thurs Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11.30 a.m. 9:30 a.m. – 11.30 a.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 12, Wed Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 9:30 a.m. – 11.30 a.m. 9:30 a.m. – 11.30 a.m. 9.30 a.m.-11.30a.m.

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of Grasshopper 3D & Revit.
Cost/Materials: N/A

CANCELED


Site In-Sight: Sketching City Life

Instructors: Naksha Satish, MAUD ’22 and Gauri Nagpal, MDes/MUP’23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 10

The city draws us in with its pace, surfaces, volumes, instruments, conflicts and conversations. This week, we will build a visual language to draw this city. Our goal will be to go beyond generating pretty pictures and use the urban as an invitation to express our personal experiences of city life. This workshop will engage with multiple sites and tools of visualization. We will visit different sites every day and through hands-on drawing with media like charcoal, pastels, inks and pixels, we will create narratives of city life, rooted and free, old and new, evocative and expressive.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 6, Thurs Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 9:30 – 11 a.m. 9:30 – 11 a.m.

 Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 11, Tues Jan.12, Wed
Time: 9:30 – 11 a.m. 9:30 – 11 a.m. 9:30 – 11 a.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: Sketch Paper (simple cartridge paper, newsprint, ) Charcoal ( hard, soft, sticks powder) Pastels/paints/ink

CANCELED 


Live Space

Instructor: Min Keun Park, M. Arch II ‘22
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 10

This course considers the act of broadcasting and recording as a contemporary medium to experience the physical, immediate, and present space through multiplicities. Here, objects like screens and cameras are considered as interior objects with spatial consequences when attributed with specific scales and adjacencies in relations to its space, as we would with any objects in space. How can dwelling in a space with a “third eye” whose lens projects a real-time broadcast of itself explore the question of what it means to dwell in space, and to observe space? For instance, we can imagine that a screen that broadcasts a live recording of a present window can result ultimately in observing two “windows” that become elements of the singular space. In critically considering how the screen frames its broadcast, how can this, in return, contribute to the design and representation of this “live space”? A series of exercises will put the course ambition to the test to arrive at a design of a “live space” for each student. The course will trace its lineage to references such as artist Dan Graham’s early video studies and other media artists like Nam June Paik, and the impact of technical objects like the television that reshaped lifestyle and domesticity over the past century. As our presence becomes ever-so fluid, the course identifies with a reaction by focusing on the present, physical space as one that remains grounded, static, and constant. This course will be fully online.

Please visit the course outline for an overview of the workshop structure.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 4, Tues Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 10 a.m. – 12p.m. 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 11, Tues Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Elevating Earth: New Recipes for Rammed Earth Architecture

Instructor: Taylor Smith, M. Arch I ’24, Dylan Gibbs, M. Arch I ‘24
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 15

Rammed earth is increasingly fetishized for its visual rawness and sustainability benefits. Yet it remains a boutique material with underexplored architectural possibilities. While it is essentially similar to concrete, few rammed earth projects have pushed the material to the level of aesthetic and formal multiplicity that concrete, and many other building materials have achieved. Through its creative consideration, rammed earth has the potential to become a more commonly used, yet diverse form of sustainable construction. This class explores the possibilities of new composites of rammed earth that leverage underused finishes, additives, casting techniques, surface applications, etc. towards a more varied set of architectural expressions.

Classes will pair lectures that address issues of material, labor, ecology, culture, and fabrication with workshops where students will have a hands-on approach in applying this knowledge to a proposal for a novel use of rammed earth. The class culminates in students producing a rammed earth block and a section detail drawing articulating their “recipe” that will be compiled into a course zine titled “Elevating Earth.”

An incomplete list of unfamiliar rammed earth techniques to explore in the class:

  • Finishes (hammering, polishing, sandblasting, varnish, etc.)
  • Additives (dye, chemical admixtures, casein, natural fibers, ceramics, aggregate, etc.)
  • Casting techniques (fabric casting, ground casting, etc.)
  • Surface applications (pebbledash stucco, supergraphics, paint, grout, etc.)
  • Increased sustainability (waste stream materials, carbon capture, etc.)
  • Construction techniques: (tilt-up, modules, etc.)
  • Additional Materials Sandwich (embedded lighting and technical systems, CLT, steel, etc.)

The course will consist of 4 classes. The first two classes will focus on rammed earth projects that use the material in novel ways. The following class will be dedicated to sign-up workshop time where participants will develop their ‘recipe’ for a rammed earth block. The final deliverables for the course will consist of an ingredient list and photographed, physical sampling set to be included in the Elevating Earth Recipe Book. This ingredient list will result from the regional diversity allotted by Zoom, and students will return to Cambridge with their to-be-rammed ingredients. The instructors (and students, optionally) will create the a rammed earth block sampling set following the instructions of the recipe book. The last class will be a gallery style presentation and open discussion of participants work. At the end of the course, all of the discovered recipes will be compiled into the Elevating Earth Recipe Book.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 9 – 11:00 a.m. 9 – 11:00 a.m. 9 – 11:00 a.m.

Perquisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: $0 – 50 max on materials for additives

Enrollment Link


1 Poem and 3 Images

Instructor: Lafina Eptaminitaki, MDes ‘23
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 10

How can a text lead to an image? How can a drawing refer to a sentence? The workshop will reexamine the relationship between textuality and visuality through the analysis of one poem and the synthesis of three images.

A range of works will be presented at the beginning of each class to be used as references for further experimentation during the “imaging” process. With the poem as a point of departure, we will visually envisage its words in three images while practicing various representational media. Flipping from reading to showing and from hearing to seeing, the course will attempt to detect the connection points between words and images.

This workshop is an experiment, and it is supposed to be experienced as such based on the value of process rather than the formal production of polished final products.

Course Outline

Week 1

Date: Jan. 4, Tue Jan. 6, Thurs
Time: 10 – 11 a.m. 10 – 11 a.m.

Week 2

Date: Jan. 11, Tue Jan. 13, Thurs
Time: 10 – 11 a.m. 10 – 11 a.m.

 Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: Digital/Analog media

Enrollment Link


Border Urbanism and Geospatial Intelligence: Spatial and conflict mitigation using augment and virtual reality technologies

Instructor: Alia Bader, MAUD ’21, Bruce Boucek, GIS, Data and Research Librarian, and Mathew Cook, Digital Scholarship Program Manager for the Harvard Library
Zoom Link: TBA
Max Enrollment: 10

This course is interested in the application of technology and digital tool in spatial conflict mitigation with a focus on collaborative AR/VR software to design for and by agents of/on contested sites.

The intent is to challenge the democratization of the design process by utilizing relatively “universal” tools, more specifically the smartphone. By deploying this accessible device, the course will explore how design agency can be restructured or redistributed from top-down design to on ground actors/agents of said contested site.

With the smartphone at the center of this process, the focus will be to use AR/VR to mediate spatial conflict, through real-time contestation, collaboration, and resolution at spatial and non-spatial dimensions.

Sites can vary in scale from national borders, landscape borders, to walls, sidewalks, etc… Proposed interventions can also vary in scope and scale, from territorial strategies to urban solutions, to urban/landscape artifacts (ie. Installations, graffiti, etc.).

The learning outcomes of the course is to understand the efficacy of AR/VR in reconciling zones of conflict using design. But more importantly, the course will concentrate on advancing technical skills in the use of augmented reality and virtual reality software: from extracting and working with data, to advanced modeling software, sharing and collaboration of models to digital devices, exporting to immersive VR headsets, 3d mapping projects in AR/VR, and real-time modeling in VR.

While the course will be conducted in virtual format, the methodologies that will be explored will address workflows for working both on-site and remotely.

Week 1

Date: Jan. 3, Mon Jan. 4, Tues Jan. 5, Wed Jan. 6, Thurs Jan. 7, Fri
Time: 9 am – 12 pm 9 am – 12 pm 9 am – 12 pm 9 am – 12 pm 9 am – 12 pm

Week 2

Date: Jan. 10, Mon Jan. 11, Tues Jan. 12, Wed Jan. 13, Thurs Jan. 14, Fri
Time: 9 am – 12 pm 9 am – 12 pm 9 am – 12 pm 9 am – 12 pm 9 am – 12 pm

 Prerequisites:
Mandatory: Windows 10, stable internet connection, access to VPN, a smartphone and a google cardboard headset. Optional: Oculus Quest Headset (CRG has a limited amount of headsets if you would like to borrow an Oculus Quest inquire with [email protected]), smartphone with LIDAR scanner. Ex. Iphone 12 and 13 PRO) Software: Basic understanding of Rhinoceros
Cost/Materials: N/ Google Cardboard Headset ($10 USD) + cost per file export on Reality Capture and Polycam (cost depends on file size).

Enrollment Link


To view other J-Term opportunities, please visit: staging.gsd.harvard.edu/otherjterm/