Vectorworks, Sonya Falkovskaia

Mosaic Architecture, or, Lessons for Representation from the Films of Frederick Wiseman, Kyle Winston

Dynamic Mutations GSD V5.0, Michael Pryor, Pavlina Vardoulaki, Nicolas Turchi

Introduction to Data Science for Building Performance Simulation and Architectural Design, Jung Min Han

Intro to Blender 2.83 (Rendering and Animating Workflows for Architects), Emily Majors

CANCELED – Autonomous Part, Saul Kim

Architecture's Scribe, Frankie Perone

Internal Landscapes: Atriums, Courtyards and Interior Gardens, Jaz Bonnin

FULL – Waste, Not Waste, Elif Erez and Cynthia Deng

FULL – Mending as (World) Building, Elif Erez and Cynthia Deng

FULL – Casting an Ideal House, Arta Perezic and Ever Vargas

Design Your Future, Adam Royalty

FULL – Thinking and Making Models, Adrian Wong

Hyper-normalized, Nima Shariat Zamanpour

Community Collaboration 101: Tools and Strategies for Developing Partnerships, Morgan Vought, Elifimina Mizrahi, and Lillian Mensah

Drifting – Mapping the Urban Experience Together, Liad Sandmann

Territorial Disputes in the Southern Caucasus, Shant Charoian and Catherine Saint

FULL – Exploring AI and Neural Networks in Design, Gia Jung and Claire Djang

CANCELED – Bodies and Geometries: Digital and Physical, Gia Jung

Polyline to Print: introduction printmaking for designers, Kevin Liu

HUPO Engagement Retreat, Ben Demers, Catherine Saint, and Sarah Smyth

CANCELED – Micro-habits and Somatic Therapy, Ellen Herra, G Laster, and Sharon Welch

Game Jam Interactive Geometry, Runjia Tian

Small Farm to Food Insecure: matching needs with surplus, Kira Clingen, Tessa Crespo, and Amy Thornton

Radical Uncertainty: An Introduction to Design Engineering & Complex Systems, Benjamin Villa

Digital Landforming, Mark Heller and Andy Lee

Courses are added and updated on a daily basis.


Vectorworks

Instructors: Sonya Falkovskaia, M. Arch 1 2023
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: n/a

This course teaches the Vectorworks program and its interface. Vectorworks is a BIM CAD software that works in both 2D and 3D. It is specifically designed for architects and its main advantage is its organization producing a streamlined workflow in drawing production, making drawing production a much more efficient and time-effective exercise. A very popular drawing software amongst small to medium-sized firms in Europe, knowing Vectorworks will be a useful skill when applying for jobs. Students can download the program free of charge and it is compatible with Mac and Windows. The course will be taught using Vectorworks version 2021.

Course Schedule:

  • Meeting 1: 2D interface and introduction
  • Meeting 2: 3D interface
  • Meeting 3: Drawing production
Date Tues. Jan 5 Wed. Jan 6 Thurs. Jan 7
Time 10am-12pm 10am-12pm 10am-12pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A


Mosaic Architecture, or, Lessons for Representation from the Films of Frederick Wiseman

Instructors: Kyle Winston, M. Arch '22
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 12

From Ivone Marguiles's Nothing Happens: Chantal Akerman's Hyperrealist Everyday (Duke University Press, 1996), pp. 176:

To describe the formal film, the avant-garde mode preceding structural film, P. Adams Sitney uses the notion of the mosaic, “a tight nexus of content, a shape designed to explore the facets of the material.” He derives this term from the title of Peter Kubelka's film Mosaik, a term that expresses “this conscious aspiration. Recurrences, prolepses, antitheses, and overall rhythms are the rhetoric of the formal.” Discussing a different genre, the direct-cinema documentary work of Frederick Wiseman, Bill Nichols also uses the notion of the mosaic to describe how Wiseman's assumption that “social events have multiple causes and must be analyzed as webs of interconnecting influences and patterns” leads him toward a poetic rather than a narrative organization. Nichols refines his analysis by suggesting that Wiseman's work, which displays recognizable narrative sequences, differs from other mosaic structures in that “the tesserae [facets] merge to yield a coherent whole when seen from a distance, whereas an individual facet conveys little sense of the overall design.”

The course has two parts: (1) the viewing and discussion of selected films, and (2) the discussion of the notion of the mosaic as a means of representation for architecture.

Schedule: (Prior to first session: watch Titicut Follies (1967) and National Gallery (2014), available on Kanopy)

  • Session 1: Brief introduction of Wiseman, discussion; for following session: watch Welfare (1975) and Belfast, Maine (1999) with selected readings
  • Session 2: Discussion, for following session: watch Chantal Akerman's Toute une nuit (1982) and Jeanne Dielman, 23 quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975) with selected readings
  • Session 3: Brief lecture on the mosaic (as well as the related catalog and atlas) and a brief history of the triptych, discussion of films; for last session: choose from Wiseman filmography and make 2-3 screenshot+ triptychs
  • Session 4: Present films and triptychs, discussion

(After last session, watch new film City Hall (2020))

This course invites anyone who enjoys talking about and learning through film. No previous knowledge of material is expected. This is a discussion-based course. Please contact Kyle Winston with any questions.

Date  Jan 5, Tues Jan 7, Thurs Jan 12, Tues Jan 14, Thurs
Time 1-2:30pm 1-2:30pm 1-2:30pm 1-2:30pm

Prerequisites: DVD's from Zipporah films or access to expanded Kanopy Library
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Dynamic Mutations GSD V5.0

Instructors: Michael Pryor, Pavlina Vardoulaki, Nicolas Turchi, M. Arch II ‘18
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: n/a

Welcome to the 5th version of the Dynamic Mutations GSD course we have taught for Harvard GSD's J-Term.

In this course we will focus on workflows using Autodesk Maya and McNeel Rhino + Grasshopper. The course will start with an introduction to polygonal modelling with Maya and build up towards fluid architectural design aesthetics. We will then use Grasshopper3d with the Pufferfish plugin to create, morph and panelize meshes with complex blended patterns. Lastly, you will learn how to design via animation and create renderings with Maya's Arnold render engine. Along the way, there will be lots of manual and parametric modeling tips & tricks taught to you by industry design professionals who are currently working at Zaha Hadid Architects and Nike.

Date Mon, Jan 4 Tues, Jan 5
Time 9am-4pm 9am-4pm

Prerequisites: Basic familiarity with Grasshopper and Maya is welcome but not required
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Introduction to Data Science for Building Performance Simulation and Architectural Design

Instructors: Jung Min Han, DDes ‘22
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 35

The modeling of net-zero energy buildings is an increasing concern in both the building design and sustainable consulting industries. Early adoption of building performance simulation software in the decision-making process of the designing phase is imperative to achieving sustainable design goals. Guiding designers to pursue sustainability for built environments will bring favorable outcomes with low-cost adaptations. Machine learning and data science are promising approaches to shaping the design process and offering instantaneous performance feedback. The active use of data science techniques is increasing the efficiency and accuracy of building simulation workflow while optimizing the buildings' geometry.

This class introduces several methods of environmental analysis techniques and a few building performance simulation tools, used for daylighting, airflow, and energy simulations. The required programming skills and analysis techniques are incorporated by importing generic weather information to predict energy use in response to design changes. This course also introduces data management skills including Python scripting, machine learning, and 3D data visualization.

The course consists of lectures and workshops over the course of 5 days covering various building simulation and data science topics. We will determine the course objectives and topics of concentration on Day 1, to cater to individual and shared interests.

Date Mon, Jan 11 Tues, Jan 12 Wed, Jan 13 Thurs, Jan 14 Fri, Jan 15
Time 9-11am 9-11am 9-11am 9-11am 9-11am

Prerequisites: Considering the time limitations, I encourage you to prepare in advance to get the full benefit of this course. For those unfamiliar with Python, I recommend reviewing a Python tutorial for a general understanding of basic operations. Students without prior experience in Python or other programming languages will be able to follow and participate in these introductory workshops.
Cost/Materials: Anaconda package (Python & Jupyter notebook), Grasshopper (GH-Python, Archsim, DIVA, Butterfly), and Rhinoceros OS.

Enrollment Link


Intro to Blender 2.83 (Rendering and Animating Workflows for Architects)

Instructors: Emily Majors, M. Arch I ‘23
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 20

This course runs through the workflow for outputting high-quality rendered images and animations using the free and opensource software, Blender. The course will touch on basic modeling within blender as well as the more popular workflow for architecture students of importing geometry from rhino. I want to organize the course in two parts (1: interface intro and rendering fundamentals. 2: basic animations and physics simulations).

During the first week, the course will dive into setting up cameras, lighting, environments, materials, and UV unwrapping. The course will also introduce a plethora of free online resources for downloading textures, HDRIs, and scene entourage. The goal for the students will be to master outputting ready to go images with little to no post-processing needed.

During the second week, the course will introduce animation basics looking at setting up rigs, keyframes, and applying physics constraints to objects. The students will then apply what they learned in the first week to output a fully textured and rendered animation.

Examples of Blender’s capabilities as a supporting tool for architectural design, thinking, and representation:

Week 1

Date Mon, Jan 4 Wed, Jan 6 Fri, Jan 8
Time 2:30-4pm 2:30-4pm 2:30-4pm

Week 2

Date Mon, Jan 11 Wed, Jan 13 Fri, Jan 15
Time 2:30-4pm 2:30-4pm 2:30-4pm

Prerequisites: Students should have a project they want to produce renders for (maybe one from a previous studio or I can provide a 3D scene for you to practice with).
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Autonomous Part

Instructors: Saul Kim, M. Arch II ‘21
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 8

This course aims to experiment and discover new ways of thinking about architectural parts and their spatial consequences through autonomization. It involves experimenting with architectural parts independent from functional and practical notion to question their ontology. Participants will each choose multiple architectural elements of their interest to deeply analyze its nature and begin to objectify them. The part will be given anomalous characteristics that defy its use, function, and purpose. The autonomous part is then juxtaposed with other conventional parts to form a piece of experimental architecture where we could accidentally discover new functional implications. This design exercise requires basic 3D modelling skills.

Week 1

Date Mon, Jan 4 Tues, Jan 5 Wed, Jan 6 Thurs, Jan 7 Fri, Jan 8
Time 1- 3pm 1- 3pm 1- 3pm 1- 3pm 1- 3pm


Prerequisites:
Architecture background with basic 3D modelling and rendering skills.

Cost/Materials: N/A

**Course Canceled**


Architecture's Scribe

Instructors: Frankie Perone, M. Arch I ‘20
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 15

Despite being considered reciprocal design practices, two of an architect’s primary technical tools, drawing and building, seemingly contradict each other. Orthographic drawing, with anthropological roots in “writing”, which possibly comes from Ancient Greek “graphein”, “to dig, scratch” is semantically paradoxical to “construct”, from Latin “constructuere”, “to pile up, accumulate”. Faced with the impossible dilemma of simultaneously excavating and constructing, how do we, the master builders, reconcile these antipodes of our practice?

This amateur anthropologist/poet/historian/architect-tinted course will investigate the structural, cultural, and etymological relationships between the written and the built. Writing formats and techniques (Manuscript, Verse, Epitaph) will be uncovered in parallel to architectural typologies and tectonics (Crypt, Surface, Tower), drawing from a varied and possibly overwhelming collection of texts, etymologies, images, history, sites, and buildings. This palimpsest of association is intentional and hopefully productive; a pile of references allows us to draw connections beyond the references themselves. Where close readings can give us certainty, parallelism provides possibility.

The course is part lecture, part discourse, part design. We will build our orthographic agility through quick exercises, including carving crypts, producing poems, and extracting elevations. While my knowledge is limited, and therefore reflected in the course’s references, I would like to take a moment to welcome anyone with an interest in uncertainties and discoveries to join the discussion.

Week 1

Date Mon, Jan 4 Wed, Jan 6
Time 3-5pm 3-5pm

Week 2

Date Mon, Jan 11 Wed, Jan 13
Time 3-5pm 3-5pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Internal Landscapes: Atriums, Courtyards and Interior Gardens

Instructors: Jaz Bonnin, MDes ‘21
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 30

This seminar will examine atriums, courtyards and interior gardens as unique design typologies that incorporate landscape, architecture and interior elements into cohesive spaces. Poised at the intersection between indoor and outdoor, these spaces play an important role by introducing natural light, air flow, water, and other natural elements into our built environments. Unlike greenhouses, where plants are the primary inhabitants, these “internal landscapes” center on human occupation, and they have the ability to activate and open up enclosed spaces while remaining contained themselves. Perhaps because of these complexities and contradictions, these typologies are rarely given great attention in traditional design education. Nevertheless, “internal landscapes” have existed for millennia across different cultures and in many different forms, and continue to inform our modern design practices.

Date Mon, Jan 11 Wed, Jan 13 Fri, Jan 15
Time 9am – 11am 9am – 11am 9am – 11am

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Waste, Not Waste

Instructors: Elif Erez M.Arch I + MDes '22 and Cynthia Deng M.Arch I + MUP '21
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 12

Jumping off from anthropologist Mary Douglas' assertion that waste is “matter out of place”, this class uses shared readings and collective diagramming to explore the sociocultural classifications that construct ‘waste' and some of its spatial consequences. Shifting towards our futures, what are some alternate value systems or modes of action (care work, abolition, a Green New Deal, etc.) that can shift dominant cultures around waste? And where would the design professions fit in that? We don't have the answers but we can explore possibilities together. Each meeting session would be based on topics around the subject of waste, and be structured around discussion and in-class collective diagramming exercises with the goal of creating a collective map of un-wasting.

Week 1

Date Tues, Jan 5 Thurs, Jan 7
Time 3 – 5pm 3 – 5pm

Week 2

Date Tues, Jan 12 Thurs, Jan 14
Time 3 – 5pm 3 – 5pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Course Full – please email jterm@gsd.harvard.edu to be added to the waitlist. 


Mending as (World) Building

Instructors: Elif Erez M.Arch I + MDes '22 and Cynthia Deng M.Arch I + MUP '21
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 8

Weaving together fiction narrative techniques with standpoint theory and repair-oriented design practices, this course uses mending as a form of world-building. Over the course of six meetings across two weeks, each student will identify an object in need of repair (on the scale of something that could be picked up) and repair it. Here, ‘repair’ does not seek to restore past conditions, but adapts to future ones — it is a transformative act of care. Through actively repairing the object by material intervention, we will also speculate on repairing the larger systems and networks that this object is part of. Each of us will create a research-based cast of characters who interact with the object. Finally, through images and words, each person will craft a story that weaves together these pieces (the object, the characters, and the systems), building a world through the act of mending.

Week 1

Date Mon, Jan 4 Wed, Jan 6 Fri, Jan 8
Time 3-6pm 3-6pm 3-6pm

Week 2

Date Mon, Jan 11 Wed, Jan 13 Fri, Jan 15
Time 3-6pm 3-6pm 3-6pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Course Full – please email jterm@gsd.harvard.edu to be added to the waitlist. 


Casting an Ideal House

Instructors: Arta Perezic, M. Arch II '21 and Ever Vargas, M. Arch II '20
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 8

This course will explore the use of casting as a representational tool. Starting from primitive shapes, this class will guide students to first design a simple house. The class will first go over techniques of mold making, dyes, and mixes, to then build the necessary formwork, and ultimately cast a model of their ideal house. All disciplines and model-making proficiency welcome.

Date Mon, Jan 11 Tues, Jan 12 Wed, Jan 13 Thurs, Jan 14 Fri, Jan 15
Time 10am-12pm 10am-12pm 10am-12pm 10am-12pm 10am-12pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: Approx. $50 for casting material, buckets, and formwork material.

Course Full – please email jterm@gsd.harvard.edu to be added to the waitlist. 


Design Your Future

Instructors: Adam Royalty, DDes '23
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 50

The future can feel uncertain. It is not even clear how the next few months will unfold. How does this uncertainty affect your time at Harvard? How does it impact your plans post-Harvard? Design Your Future is a two-session course where participants learn to apply Human Centered Design to navigate tough decisions in their careers and life.

Date Tues, Jan 12 Thurs, Jan 14
Time 9am – 12pm 9am – 12pm

Prerequisites: Having any feelings of uncertainly about the future.
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Thinking and Making Models

Instructors: Adrian Wong, M. Arch II '20
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 10

This three-day workshop will explore the shifting role of architecture models and fabrication in the remote format through various lenses.

With the loss of access to precision tools for physical model fabrication, this workshop proposes incorporating a model thinking by investigating methods we can maintain the presence of physical models by way of an under-examined subject: model theory and pedagogy. Through rethinking the means and ends of architecture models (now on virtual platforms), this workshop hopes to reinforce and further advance the discussion of what constitutes an architecture model in the 21st century.

This workshop will present research on the history and development of models throughout 20th century. The transition from Beaux-arts into Modernism, paired with the industrialization of the gilded age and the influence of Bauhaus gave rise to the personal miniaturized architectural models we know today. Within this timeframe, the historic span of models included the categorization of 1. the photo model, 2. the idea model, and 3. the art object. The separation of these categories was introduced in part by the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies Idea as Model exhibition in 1976, as well as the exhibition Das Architekturmodell (The Architecture Model – Tool, Fetish, Small Utopia) in 2012 at the Deutsches Architekturmuseum.

This workshop hopes to aid home-fabrication techniques by studying historical model examples and reviewing how current home-remedy solutions can have pedagogical relations to earlier architecture modeling in the early 20th century. The workshop believes it is crucial that any research or work produced during the period of remote learning should not be considered a concession, but should instead retain a role in affecting longer-lasting disciplinary discourse.

Date Wed, Jan 6 Thurs, Jan 7 Fri, Jan 8
Time 9-11am 9-11am 9-11am

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Course Full – please email jterm@gsd.harvard.edu to be added to the waitlist. 


Hyper-normalized

Instructors: Nima Shariat Zamanpour, M. Arch I ‘22
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 10

Hyper-normalization, a term coined by Soviet born anthropologist Alexei Yurchak, describes the acceptance of a fakeness as real in the final years of the USSR. A term and experience that predates and offers illumination for the post-truth mainstream discussion of today. This course will examine and discuss hyper-normalization in and around design disciplines, through the lens of fringe theories, revisionist histories, and lost figures.  Through this survey, the course aims to arm designers to reclaim agency in the manufactured chaos of the contemporary.

We will examine conspiratorial thinking as productive method by unpacking colonial myths of the ancients. We will look at revisionist narratives of and alternatives to the Modernist movement. We will unpack the geo-political underpinnings of early 21st architecture, with a special focus on USSR satellite nations and their iconic architecture. We will look at design's role in mediated futures, ranging from a technical analysis of deep fakes to the doomsday survival culture of New Zealand and Mars.

The course will be divided into daily chronological clusters comprising of short lectures, followed by a discussion of supplemental texts and film, and work time on individual projects and research relating to the course topics. The final day will be reserved for presentations by course members on the topics they have researched and produced on.

Date Mon, Jan 4 Tues, Jan 5 Wed, Jan 6 Thurs, Jan 7 Fri, Jan 8
Time 11:30am – 1pm

 

11:30am – 1pm

 

11:30am – 1pm

 

11:30am – 1pm

 

11:30am – 1pm

 

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Community Collaboration 101: Tools and Strategies for Developing Partnerships

Instructors: Morgan Vought, MLA ‘22, Elifimina Mizrahi, MUP ‘21, and Lillian Mensah, MUP ‘21
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 20

Although the importance of community involvement is often stressed, forging, fostering, and furthering community relationships during the design process is challenging. Working with community members requires nuance and respect, as well as a specific skill set. Along with our fellow classmates, we have observed a lack of curricular training on how to build community partnerships during the design process. We at the Community Development Program (CPD) advocate for the importance of community voices in design, not only from an ethical standpoint, but also because working with the local community results in a more fruitful and relevant final design. Over the course of three sessions, we will learn techniques and develop strategies for establishing and nurturing community partnership:

Day 1: We begin at the start of the design process: how to initiate and solidify a community relationship. With the help of guest speakers, guided discussions, and role-play activities, we will explore how to respectively enter a community, build trust, listen, and ask questions.  We will address questions such as:

  • How to include historically excluded community voices into the design process?
  • How to develop credibility and trust in a community?
  • How to reach a broad range of community members?
  • How to initiate a neighborhood partnership when you have not been specifically invited by local members?

Day 2: During our second session, we continue the conversation by discussing the development of a partnership through the design process. With the help of guest practitioners, we will look at precedents and discuss the outcomes of a spectrum of community engagement strategies.

  • What are techniques for gathering site information from a community?
  • How might we begin to understand what a community wants from a site?
  • How might community input sessions be organized?
  • How can community input be synthesized?
  • How to negotiate community divisions and differences?

Day 3: During our final session, we will discuss techniques for involving the community in project implementation, as well as ways to continue a relationship post-project.

  • What are ways in which the community could be involved in project implementation?
  • Why is maintaining a community partnership important even after a project has been completed?
  • How to evaluate the success of a design through a community lens?

 

Students who participate in this course will have the opportunity to continue developing the skills learned during the workshop through specific community projects around the Boston area, or virtually, with CDP during Spring term.

Week 1

Date Mon, Jan 4 Wed, Jan 6 Fri, Jan 8
Time 9am – 12pm 9am – 12pm 9am – 12pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link 


Drifting – Mapping the Urban Experience Together

Instructors: Liad Sandmann, M. Arch II ‘21
Collaborator: Stav Dror, Yale M. Arch II ‘22
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 18

One of architecture's most elusive units of time is the Situation. Our ability to document and analyze spatial events marks the base for scenario-based architecture. In this 4-day workshop, we will go on Solo City Trips using a method called Drifting. This Situationist method calls on us to rediscover and reconstruct the built environment by producing stunning collages of our urban experience.

In 1956, Guy Debord published his “Theory of the Drift” – a radical way to experience, record, document, and map urban space through subjective investigations. To Drift, one must set a rule to randomly determine the city's exploration. The Drift expands the definition of the physical beyond the tyranny of geography, law, and norm. It's also fun.

The remote workshop will combine lectures on urban theory, physical exercise (assisted or otherwise), mapping, and freeform representation techniques resulting in subjective documentation of each participant's Drift. The workshop will result in each participant procuring a new method to explore the built environment and new representation and mapping skills, ranging from collage to storytelling to cartography.

Date Tues, Jan 5 Wed, Jan 6 Thurs, Jan 7 Fri, Jan 8
Time 9a-1p 9a-1p 9a-1p 9a-1p

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Territorial Disputes in the Southern Caucasus

Instructors: Shant Charoian, M. Arch II ’22 and Catherine Saint, MUP ‘21
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 20

Explorations of Nagorno-Karabakh, an area of 4,400 km squared, in the southern Caucuses. This J-term course was inspired by the current conflict in the Artsakh region. This course will look at this age old conflict through a myriad of ways: through design, socio-political & economic forces and changing regimes. The goal of this research based discussion is for each participant to produce visuals that embody this conflict through the lens of one of the aforementioned topics. In working with the curator of  the Armenian Pavilion, the final work will be exhibited in La Biennale di Venezia 2021.

Date Thurs, Jan 7 Fri, Jan 8 Mon, Jan 11
Time 11am – 1pm 11am – 1pm 11am – 1pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Exploring AI and Neural Networks in Design

Instructors: Gia Jung, M. Arch I '20 and Claire Djang, M. Arch I '20
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 20

Learn to use Machine Learning in your design process, and start thinking about the new role and agency of designers in the age of algorithms, data, and fast machines.

The course will introduce machine learning for designers in three parts: principles of generative learning in its high-level overview, design applications of such methods in the form of projects, and interactive workshop on using machine learning in design.

For tangible skills, we will learn how to read machine learning codes and be able to use Python and other open source libraries for designers. If time allows, we will think about strategies to collect and curate data for generative learning for AI libraries in Architecture, Urban Design, and Design at large. On a more conceptual level, we will actively think about the new role of designers in data curation, collection, and presentation; human-computer-interaction interfacing design and AI; and new agency of designers in guiding the model and applying algorithms for creative and sociotechnically productive purposes.

Week 1

Date Mon, Jan 4 Wed, Jan 6 Fri, Jan 8
Time 1-3p 1-3p 1-3p

Week 2

Date Mon, Jan 11 Wed, Jan 13 Fri, Jan 15
Time 1-3p 1-3p 1-3p

Prerequisites: The Following is helpful, but not necessary: Basic understanding of Machine Learning, Deep Learning, other AI tools and concepts, Python, and Command-Line-Interface (All Optional).
Cost/Materials: Potential use of remote machines, which can shorten some time in training, but is not required.

Course Full – please email jterm@gsd.harvard.edu to be added to the waitlist. 


Bodies and Geometries: Digital and Physical

Instructors: Gia Jung, M. Arch I '20
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 10

How can we design digital artifacts for the body in a responsive way? Adopting principles from geometric pattern making in fashion design, we will look at how we can move between bodies for which design is serving and the artifacts being designed. Using grasshopper and other simulation software, we will script our design to produce garments in both physical and digital mediums. The later half of the course will be dedicated to adopting these learnings in either physical productions (clothing, artifacts, etc.) or virtual representations leveraging technologies such as AR/VR and/or web platforms.

Week 1

Date Tues, Jan 5 Thurs, Jan 7
Time 2-5pm 2-5pm

Week 2

Date Tues, Jan 12 Thurs, Jan 14
Time 2-5pm 2-5pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: Materials if students choose to fabricate

CANCELED


Polyline to Print: introduction printmaking for designers

Instructors: Kevin Liu, MDes ‘21
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 9

This is a 4-day beginner’s level printmaking course that aims to introduce the fundamentals and basics of intaglio etching, situated alongside architectural representation, and practice. The workshop will start with a short session on the early period of printmaking, focusing on copper plate intaglio etching before moving to contemporary printing and plotting techniques, specifically the AxiDraw, and how that can be integrated into the tradition of printmaking processes.

This course is designed to be delivered remotely. Unfortunately, due to the limitations of the workspace I will not be able to host any participants in person. All printmaking processes including proofing and printing will be streamed live on Zoom, with verbal descriptions and conversation of all steps to be described live via webcam.

Each participant will be in charge of developing up their own 4 x 6″ copper plate image, etched and proofed (test-printed) virtually in the workshop. The image to be etched on to the plate should be supplied as a vector PDF, which will then be plotted with the AxiDraw on to a prepared copper etching plate, and then etched in an acid solution. The plate will then be inked up using traditional etching inks and then proofs will be made on archival cotton etching paper. Printing will be demonstrated on a Takach Etching Press.

Each participant at the end will receive their copper etching plate, as well as a small edition (3) of their prints, as well as any other proofs made along the way. Each participant will be asked to cover the cost of the plate as well as all or a portion of their postage costs. Paper and inks will be included at no cost.

A summary of the workshop is as follows:

  • Workshop 1: A short History of Printmaking and introduction to the print project, with examples
  • Workshop 2: A short introduction to the processes of printmaking
  • Submission: Deadline for artwork for 4 x 6″ to be provided in PDF form (Friday 8)
  • Workshop 3: (Flexible) Will be a booked in live workshop after the plates have been etched where I will demonstrate the proofing of your etching plate.
  • Workshop 4: Virtual Pinup of all the prints, discussion and wrap up.

Required Meeting Dates:

Date Tues, Jan 5 Wed, Jan 6 Fri, Jan 15
Time 9 – 11am 9 – 11am 9am – 1pm

 

One 2-hour session for plate proofing during a selected date/time below:

Date Mon, Jan 11 Tues, Jan 12 Wed, Jan 13 Thurs, Jan 14
Time 9am – 1pm 9am – 1pm 9am – 1pm 9am – 1pm

 Prerequisites: This course is designed for people with no printmaking experience and no knowledge of printmaking is preferred.  However, knowledge of Illustrator or a CAD package that can print to PDF with vector linework is absolutely required, you will need to produce a Vector linework artwork (preferable as PDF) in order to be able to prepare a plate for printing.
Cost/Materials: $35 to cover the cost of 1 etching plate as well as postage costs. All paper and inks included.

Enrollment Link


HUPO Engagement Retreat

Instructors: Ben Demers, MUP ‘22, Catherine Saint, MUP ‘21, and Sarah Smyth, MUP ‘21
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 50

The field of urban planning and design possesses the ability to make our cities, regions, and world more equitable. However, much of the history of the profession is tied to destructive, exploitative, and exclusionary practices, often to the detriment of communities of color and other marginalized groups. While many of us have come to this program to rethink the role of the planner in engaging these communities (often spurred by our own experiences), it can be daunting to know how to turn our personal or community beliefs into actual practice.

Over the course of three days, this workshop will create the space for MUP students to reflect on their power, privilege, and positionality, hone their own planning ethos, and begin thinking about how this ethos can inform their work in community engagement. The intent is to build off the themes of last year’s Equity Curriculum, by supporting first-year MUPs before their second-semester studio and second-year MUPs as they prepare for their post-grad job search. By bringing in outside facilitators, we hope that students will be free to engage with these concepts outside of the pressure and power dynamics present in a traditional studio/classroom space.

Each session over the three days will be no more than four hours, combining small-group shares, crafting time, and lectures to limit zoom fatigue. Alumni of the MUP program and Loeb Fellowship will join the last day for virtual fireside chats, giving students a chance to ask questions about translating engagement skills to real world practice.

*Full details and schedule will be shared once facilitators are confirmed*

Date Mon, Jan 11 Tues, Jan 12 Wed, Jan 13
Time 10am – 2pm 10am – 2pm 10am – 2pm

Prerequisites: Enrollment in MUP and STU-1121: First Semester Core Urban Planning Studio
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Micro-habits and Somatic Therapy

 Instructors: Ellen Herra, MLA ’23, G Laster, MLA ‘23, and Sharon Welch, M. Arch I ‘24
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: n/a

This two-part workshop will act as a guide for how to reduce stress through the use of micro-habits: 30-second to 5-minutes exercises that we can easily incorporate into our days. The first part will be an interactive sharing and brainstorming exercise that will use mapping to understand what micro-habits are and how they can benefit you during online learning. The second part will be a workshop with trained massage therapist Ellen Herra on the EFT somatic therapy technique, which can be incorporated as a micro-habit. By the end of the workshop you will have both an understanding and a repertoire of micro-habits to improve your physical and emotional wellbeing during the semester.

Date Tues, Jan 5 Thurs, Jan 7
Time 11am – 12:30pm 11am – 12:30pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: A journal to be able to draw and write

CANCELED 


Game Jam Interactive Geometry

Instructors: Runjia Tian, MDes ’22
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 12

The class will introduce students to the creative workflow that use popular geometric modeling software Rhinoceros and its component Grasshopper in the gaming engine Unity to create interactive visualization of design.

The class is composed of three regular meeting and extra flexible office hours. The regular meeting will happen on Jan 7th, Thursday, Jan 12th, Tuesday and Jan 14th Thursday, where each meeting will be composed of a lecture/workshop. Flexible office hours will be available beyond these regular meetings to support participants’ hacking their own project.

The first regular meeting will begin with a comprehensive overview about interactive 3D computer graphics and their wide use in the creative industry. On the first day of the workshop, participants will look behind the scenes into the commonly used Computer-Aided Design software Rhinoceros and Game Engines Unity and understand the way those software work. Participants will also be introduced into how to use Application Programming Interface (APIs) and documentation for advanced use of these software. Topics such as computational geometry, computer graphics and the history of interactive design system will be explored.

The second regular meeting will be a hands-on workshop on how to set up the most recently released RhinoInside technology to create games or interactive visualization of Non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) and mesh geometries inside the Unity in real time and leverage the full potential of physics simulation and interactive design in Unity. Topics such as rigid body simulation, particle system and user interface design in Unity will be covered.

The third regular meeting will involves utilizing the workflow to create advanced visualization or games using participant’s own design project. Creating interactive visualization with shader programming, motion tracking and AR/VR will be explored during this session. At the end of the third meeting, participants will share their project cohorts and receive feedback from peers.

Date Thurs, Jan 7 Tues, Jan 12 Thurs, Jan14
Time 12 – 3pm 12 – 3pm 12 – 3pm


Prerequisites:
A Windows laptop or PC that is able to run Unity is required. SCI 6338 and programming experience in C# is strongly encouraged.
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Small Farm to Food Insecure: matching needs with surplus

Instructors: Kira Clingen, MLA/MDes’21, Tessa Crespo, MDes ’20, and Amy Thornton, MDes ’20
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 12

In the late winter of 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic threw the United States into a state of chaos an acute dual and contradictory crisis caught our attention. Due to the closing of institutions and restaurants, farmers across the country tilled under crops and poured milk down the drain, unable to sell their goods. Simultaneously, the percentage of the food insecure rose dramatically. Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, it was estimated that 1 in 11 Massachusetts families or 9% faced food insecurity. Due to COVID-19, that number increased to 38% according to Project Bread President Erin McAleer. Aware that food surplus and food insecurity was already existent; we were still stunned by the magnitude during this crisis. How was it possible that food was thrown away while so many did not have enough to feed themselves?

As designers, we believe our skills can serve the challenges faced by small local farmers and the food insecure in New England, exacerbated by COVID-19, climate change, and other crises yet unknown. However, we know our answers must come from those already engaged in this work otherwise assumptions made are not only arrogant but irrelevant and inapplicable. Thus, we interviewed small farmers, institutional food producers, distributors, Food Bank employees, gleaning organizations, food skills educators, and food shelf volunteers to discover from those doing the work of growing, distributing and consuming the food where successes and challenges lie, to amplify the work already in action, and discover where change is best made to collectively create solutions. Through these interviews we found that the COVID-19 crisis amplified broader, long-standing issues within our food system such as the stranglehold of large food distribution companies, the challenges of storage and timely transportation, the difficulty in providing nutrient-rich fresh food to the food insecure, the insufficient crop yield and time of harvest data for small farms, and the undervaluing of fresh local food, the small farm, and skilled food work.

This course will be one 3-hr session starting with a discussion period about how scale and distance impact the design process, especially in regards to rural, agricultural landscape, followed by a short lecture on our key findings and the ways in which we believe designers might help. We will then hold a collaborative sketching and brainstorming session and come together to share and critique our concepts and ideas to move forward.

Date Mon, Jan 4
Time 9am – 12pm


Prerequisites:
N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Radical Uncertainty: An Introduction to Design Engineering & Complex Systems

Instructors: Benjamin Villa, MDE ‘22
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: 14

This course will examine the art and practice of design engineering as a means for intervention in complex systems. Discussion topics include multi-scalar phenomena, systems thinking, and information theory. Participants will apply familiar frameworks to unfamiliar problem spaces through systems mapping, agent-based modeling, and forecasting. In this seminar, we will discuss how to design interventions considering emergence, feedback loops and unintended consequences. By attempting to understand the origin of the unpredictable design engineering can identify underlying problem architectures and create and implement solutions across scales.

Readings that will be discussed include: Advancing the Art of Simulation in the Social Sciences by Robert Axelrod, The Fourth Dimension of Life: Fractal Geometry and Allometric Scaling of Organisms, Dilemmas in a General Theory of Planning by Rittel and Webber, Scale by Geoffrey West, Emergent Engineering: Reframing the Grand Challenge for the 21st Century by David C. Krakauer, Physics of Life: The Evolution of Everything by Adrian Bejan and Pattern Thinking by R. Buckminster Fuller.

All readings will be provided to those who register.

No prior knowledge is required except an interest in the interrelationship of knowledge and willingness to integrate disciplines.

Date Mon, Jan 4 Wed, Jan 6 Fri, Jan 8
Time 11am-1pm 11am-1pm 11am-1pm

Prerequisites: N/A
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


Digital Landforming

Instructors: Mark Heller, MLA ‘19 and Andy Lee, MLA/MUP ‘20
Zoom Link:
Max Enrollment: n/a

This class will be an intensive workshop on digital landforming. Students will work primarily in Rhino (supplemented by AutoCAD) to achieve fluency in 2D and 3D transformations of landform and understand the conventions of topographic documentation. By the completion of the class, participants will be able to work iteratively through contour lines and surfaces as complementary elements of a design process. MLA students entering Core 4 and Core 2 are strongly encouraged to participate.

Schedule: The workshop will take place Jan 11-15, from 8:00 am to 6:00 pm. Each day will be structured around a recorded lecture, a synchronous pin-up, and time for independent assignment work. The pin-ups will be in the morning at 8:00-10:00 am. Following the pin-up, students will watch a recorded lecture, at the end of which a series of exercises for that day will be announced. Students will work independently on the exercises at their own pace before the pin-up the next morning.

Date Mon, Jan 11 Tues, Jan 12 Wed, Jan 13 Thurs, Jan 14 Fri, Jan 15
Time 8am – 6pm 8am – 6pm 8am – 6pm 8am – 6pm 8am – 6pm

Prerequisites: MLA degree candidates
Cost/Materials: N/A

Enrollment Link


To view other J-Term opportunities, please visit: staging.gsd.harvard.edu/otherjterm/